Reading Time: 2 minutes

Oregon firefighters get a new mascot thanks to a generous young boy: Even small acts can have large impacts

Ryan Denison is the Senior Fellow for Theology at Denison Forum, where he contributes writing and research to many of the ministry’s productions.

He is in the final stages of earning his PhD in church history at BH Carroll Theological Institute after having earned his MDiv at Truett Seminary. Ryan has also taught at BH Carroll and Dallas Baptist University.

He and his wife, Candice, live in East Texas and have two children.

email

Mattel's "Baby Yoda" on dispaly at the annual New York Toy Fair 2020, at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York, NY, on February 22, 2020. (Photo by Anthony Behar/Sipa USA)(Sipa via AP Images)
Mattel's "Baby Yoda" on dispaly at the annual New York Toy Fair 2020, at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York, NY, on February 22, 2020. (Photo by Anthony Behar/Sipa USA)(Sipa via AP Images)

While the California wildfires have received more national attention, Oregon has been hit hard as well. So when Carver, a local five-year-old boy, learned of a donation drive to support the firefighters in his area, he wanted to help. 

As CNN‘s Marika Gerken describes, while Carver and his grandmother were picking up groceries and other supplies, his “eyes fixed on something in the toy aisle—a Baby Yoda doll.”

Baby Yoda, or “The Child” as he’s officially known, is in the Disney+ series The Mandalorian and quickly became one of the most likable and popular characters in the Star Wars Universe. Carver thought the firefighters could use him more than he could, so he sent the doll along with a note that read: “Thank you, firefighters. Here is a friend for you in case you get lonely. <3 Love Carver.”

As Gerken describes, “The firefighters now bring Baby Yoda with them everywhere and even document his travels in a Facebook group—with more than 20,000 followers—so that Carver and others can see how much Baby Yoda has helped them along the way.”

Don’t underestimate how God may use you 

Carver’s gift reminds us never to underestimate the potential impact of our generosity. 

When he and his grandmother bought Baby Yoda for the firefighters, neither had any way of knowing that their story would inspire not only their local heroes but people around the country as well. 

And that wasn’t the point of their gift anyways. They simply wanted to do something kind to help those who were risking their lives to help others. 

That kind of selfless giving is the hallmark of true generosity. And while we can never know for sure the degree to which that generosity will multiply beyond its intended purpose, we should never doubt that the One who can turn five loaves and two fish into enough to feed well over five thousand people can do more with our gifts than we can on our own (Matthew 14:12–21).

So the next time you feel like the Lord is calling you to be generous, perhaps even to the point of discomfort, remember that God’s math doesn’t always work like ours. His plans are often far bigger than our own, and he can turn even our humble good intentions into noteworthy results for his kingdom.

What did you think of this article?

Any feedback?