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An orca, or "killer whale", spy-hopping in the arctic near ship. By Petr/stock.adobe.com.

Why are orcas leading the news?

Residents wade through a street flooded by rains brought on by Hurricane Idalia, in Batabano, Cuba, Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2023. Idalia strengthened into a hurricane Tuesday and barreled toward Florida's Gulf Coast. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

Eight devastating floods and Apple’s product-launch event: A reflection on the pathway to triumphant faith

A child sits next to his fallen bike, grabbing at his scraped knee, a depiction of innocent suffering. Ermolaev Alexandr/stock.adobe.com

Why a good God must allow suffering—even innocent suffering—to exist

In this Monday, Aug. 28, 2023, 9:41 am ET satellite image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Tropical Storm Idalia moves between Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, left, and Cuba, right. Idalia intensified early Monday and was expected to become a major hurricane before it reaches Florida's Gulf coast, according to the National Hurricane Center. (NOAA via AP)

Idalia set to strike Florida tomorrow as Category 3 hurricane

A general view shows the aftermath of a wildfire in Lahaina, Hawaii, Monday, Aug. 21, 2023. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

What started the Maui wildfires? A reflection on the future of our democracy

Vehicles cross over a flood control basin that has almost reached the street, Sunday, Aug. 20, 2023, in Palm Desert, Calif. Forecasters said Tropical Storm Hilary was the first tropical storm to hit Southern California in 84 years, bringing the potential for flash floods, mudslides, isolated tornadoes, high winds and power outages. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

The latest on Tropical Storm Hilary: What disasters reveal about our moral foundations

Wildfire wreckage is seen Thursday, Aug. 10, 2023, in Lahaina, Hawaii. The search of the wildfire wreckage on the Hawaiian island of Maui on Thursday revealed a wasteland of burned out homes and obliterated communities as firefighters battled the deadliest blaze in the U.S. in recent years. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Hawaiians jumped into the ocean to escape “apocalyptic” wildfires

FILE - California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks in Sacramento, Calif., Jan. 10, 2023. On Wednesday, March 8, 2023, Newsom announced he would not renew a state contract with Walgreens after the company indicated it would not sell abortion pills in some conservative-led states. (AP Photo/José Luis Villegas, File). Actions like this are leading some cities and communities in the United States to consider secession.

Cities and communities are withdrawing from the US

Floodwater covers a property along River Rd. in Monterey County, Calif., as the Salinas River overflows its banks on Friday, Jan. 13, 2023. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Do recent storms mean California is under judgment?

FILE - Water levels are low at San Luis Reservoir, which stores irrigation water for San Joaquin Valley farms, in Gustine, Calif., Sept. 14, 2022. The past three years have been California's driest on record and state officials said that they're preparing for the streak to continue. (AP Photo/Terry Chea, File)

California is preparing for droughts and flood seasons: Why Christians should prepare for catastrophes

A river of lava flows down from Mauna Loa, Monday, Nov. 28, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Mauna Loa, the world's largest active volcano erupted Monday for the first time in 38 years. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

Mauna Loa, the largest volcano on Earth, is now erupting

Men walk past destroyed homes and debris as they walk to survey damage to other properties, two days after the passage of Hurricane Ian, in Fort Myers Beach, Fla., Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Why Hurricane Ian caught so many in Florida off guard

In this photo taken by a drone, boats lie scattered amidst mobile homes after the passage of Hurricane Ian, on San Carlos Island, in Fort Myers Beach, Fla., Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

The latest on Hurricane Ian: Did a Native American blessing protect Tampa Bay?

This Satellite image provided by NASA on Sept. 26, 2022, shows Hurricane Ian pictured from the International Space Station just south of Cuba gaining strength and heading toward Florida. Hurricane Ian rapidly intensified off Florida's southwest coast Wednesday, Sept. 28, gaining top winds of 155 mph (250 kph), just shy of the most dangerous Category 5 status. (NASA via AP)

A hurricane we’ll talk about “for many years to come”: A reflection on doubt and hope

This GOES-East GeCcolor satellite image taken at 9:56 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2022, and provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), shows Hurricane Ian passing over western Cuba. Hurricane Ian tore into western Cuba on Tuesday as a major hurricane, with nothing to stop it from intensifying into a catastrophic Category 4 storm before it hits Florida, where officials ordered 2.5 million people to evacuate before it crashes ashore Wednesday. (NOAA via AP )

“It’s going to be historic”: The latest on Hurricane Ian and two practical responses

Stock photo: A family of four in silhouette stands next to a tree in front of a sunset as the mother points to the sky. © jes2uphoto/stock.adobe.comj

Family takes world tour before children lose their vision

“It had to be God”: Bus driver helps save kids from floodwater

Pastor berates congregation for not buying him designer watch, then apologizes

Battle-equipped robot dog debuts at Russian arms fair

Kentucky woman survived flood by binding herself to her children with a vacuum cord

How a local pastor became a “lifeline” after the Kentucky floods

A “dying star’s last ‘performance’”: The James Webb Space Telescope and the omniscient timing of God

Two Pennsylvania churches cited for zoning violations after serving beyond the city’s definition of “church”

Why does a good God allow bad things?

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