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Leap-year babies fight for recognition: The significance of your second birth

Dr. Jim Denison is the CEO of Denison Forum.
His Daily Article and podcast globally reach over 160,000 subscribers. Dr. Denison guides readers to discern today’s news—biblically. He is the author of multiple books and has taught on the philosophy of religion and apologetics at several seminaries. Prior to launching Denison Forum in 2009, he pastored churches in Texas and Georgia. He holds a Ph.D and a Master of Divinity from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Jim and his wife, Janet, live in Dallas, Texas. They have two sons and four grandchildren.

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You don’t get to choose your birthdate. But if you had a choice, you might want to avoid February 29.

So-called Leap-Year Babies have trouble at the DMV and getting library cards. They miss out on birthday specials that ignore their day. On non-leap years, Facebook won’t alert your friends when your birthday comes (or doesn’t).

On the other hand, you can divide your age by four when telling people how old you are. Think of the savings on birthday candles.

Two apparently contradictory results follow, along with biblical principles they illustrate.

The significance of your second birth

One: You are remarkably unique.

According to the US Census Bureau, less than 0.07 percent of the world’s population was born on a leap day. There are only 4.8 million of you on the planet. That sounds like a lot of people—until you realize that you could easily go your entire life without meeting one of them.

Your birthdate, however, is not the most unique thing about you. While nearly five million other people share it, no one else shares your fingerprints, iris pattern, the shape of your ears, and even your toe print.

What’s even more unique about you is the fact that you were made by God in his image (Genesis 1:27). He made no one else like you. No one else can replace you. He didn’t make you because he thought the world needs another human—he made you because he wants a personal, eternal relationship with you. That’s why his Son died for you and why he would die all over again, just for you.

Two: You are completely like everyone else.

While much is unique about our bodies, much is not. In fact, we are 99.9 percent genetically similar to everyone else on the planet. No other animal has a larynx like ours, hand and thumb design just like ours, or brains like ours.

What’s even more common to us is the fact that we need a second birth from the Creator who enabled our first birth. Jesus’ statement to Nicodemus is God’s word to us all: “You must be born again” (John 3:7).

That’s because each of us—without exception—has sinned and fallen short of God’s glory (Romans 3:23). Each of us—without exception—can be saved only grace through faith (Ephesians 2:8–9). And each of us—without exception—is welcome to receive such grace if we will make Jesus our Lord (John 3:16).

Whatever the date of your first birth, it’s your second birth that matters eternally.

Have you been born again?

If so, what will you do today to help someone else experience their new birth?

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