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The ‘leaning tower of Dallas’ is still standing: The key to future legacy

Dr. Jim Denison is the CEO of Denison Forum.
His Daily Article and podcast globally reach over 160,000 subscribers. Dr. Denison guides readers to discern today’s news—biblically. He is the author of multiple books and has taught on the philosophy of religion and apologetics at several seminaries. Prior to launching Denison Forum in 2009, he pastored churches in Texas and Georgia. He holds a Ph.D and a Master of Divinity from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Jim and his wife, Janet, live in Dallas, Texas. They have two sons and four grandchildren.

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Category Culture

An eleven-story building was imploded in Dallas nine days ago, but the core that contained the elevator and stairwells remained upright.

The “leaning tower of Dallas” immediately became an icon, with people flocking to the area to take photos of the building. On Monday, demolition crews began the work of bringing down the tower.

It doesn’t seem to be going well.

A crane is smashing a wrecking ball into the structure, but the ball looks tiny compared to the building it is intended to demolish. While onlookers are mocking this effort (one is pictured holding up a sign that says, “USE A BIGGER BALL), experts say the ball is the right size for the crane and the job. It’s just that it will take three to four days to bring down the tower.

The key to future legacy

This exercise is not to be evaluated by its speed but by its eventual results. The demolition company obviously believes that its current plan is the safest and most efficient way to remove the structure. When the “leaning tower of Dallas” is finally gone, people are less likely to remember how long its removal took.

The long view is often the best view.

Even though our culture rewards results today, the most long-lasting achievements can seldom be accomplished in a day. Think of Michelangelo painting the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel or Thomas Edison testing three thousand designs on the way to producing the light bulb.

The same is true with the providence of God. Moses spent forty years in the wilderness before leading Israel through forty years of pilgrimage on their way to the Promised Land. Jesus spent three years with twelve men, knowing that through their ministry his kingdom would multiply around the world.

The key to future legacy is present obedience. William James was right: “The great use of life is to spend it for something that will outlast it.”

How will you use your life today?

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