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Is a ‘Breakfast Baconator’ on your diet? The power of breakfast with God

Dr. Jim Denison is the CEO of Denison Forum.
His Daily Article and podcast globally reach over 160,000 subscribers. Dr. Denison guides readers to discern today’s news—biblically. He is the author of multiple books and has taught on the philosophy of religion and apologetics at several seminaries. Prior to launching Denison Forum in 2009, he pastored churches in Texas and Georgia. He holds a Ph.D and a Master of Divinity from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Jim and his wife, Janet, live in Dallas, Texas. They have two sons and four grandchildren.

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Category-Christianity

Imagine this for breakfast: grilled sausage, cheese, bacon, eggs, more cheese, and more bacon, all covered in swiss cheese sauce. Wendy’s calls it the “Breakfast Baconator.” It’s 770 calories in a bun.

According to Forbes, this is just part of the chain’s plans for our breakfast. They are announcing a new morning menu set to launch March 2.

The company is investing $20 million on its breakfast launch with plans to hire twenty thousand employees. They will be competing with McDonald’s, Chick-fil-A, Taco Bell, and others.

The Bible has some interesting contributions to make to our conversation.

The power of breakfast with God

The risen Christ met his disciples “just as day was breaking” and prepared breakfast for them (John 21:4, 12). Early risers are found throughout Scripture, including Abraham (Genesis 19:27), Jacob (Genesis 28:18), Moses (Exodus 24:4), Joshua (Joshua 3:1), Gideon (Judges 6:38), Hannah and Elkanah (1 Samuel 1:19), and David (Psalm 5:3).

The early morning story that has most impacted me, however, comes from the life of Jesus.

After teaching in the synagogue at Capernaum and healing a demoniac (Mark 1:21–28), he healed Peter’s mother-in-law and then “many who were sick with various diseases” (vv. 31, 34).

After such a day, most of us would be tempted to sleep in the next morning. Not Jesus: “And rising very early in the morning, while it was still dark, he departed and went out to a desolate place, and there he prayed” (v. 35). The Greek could be translated literally, “and there he continued to pray.”

Simon and the other disciples “found him and said to him, ‘Everyone is looking for you'” (v. 37). Jesus replied, “Let us go on to the next towns, that I may preach there also, for that is why I came out” (v. 38). As a result, “he went throughout all Galilee, preaching in their synagogues and casting out demons” (v. 39).

After Jesus’ experience that morning, he chose to go to others rather than waiting for them to come to him. His decision set the tone for the rest of his ministry, fulfilling his call as the One who “came to seek and to save the lost” (Luke 19:10).

And such clarity came through an early morning encounter with his Father.

If I could make every Christian in the world follow his example, I would. I am convinced that the most essential way to begin each day is to do so with our Lord. Athletes warm up before they compete; race car drivers put fuel in their cars before they race.

President Reagan once asked an Air Force One pilot why he always tried to land so close to the front of the runway.

The pilot smiled and explained, “Well, Mr. President, they teach you in flight school that you can’t use the part of the runway that’s behind you.”

If you’re not sure how to begin a time with your Father in the morning, let me suggest First15, the devotional resource of our ministry.

My son, Craig Denison, has written a daily devotional that is preceded by a worship video and followed by a guided prayer time. I use it every morning in my time with the Lord and encourage you to consider it as well.

Whether you use First15 or other resources, I urge you to follow Jesus’ example. Start your day every day with your Lord.

Your physical breakfast, whether you risk the Baconator or something less caloric, will stay with you for a few hours.

Time spent with your Lord will change your life forever.

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