The remarkable relevance of Sir Roger Moore

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Sir Roger Moore passed away Tuesday at age eighty-nine. He was most famous for his portrayal of James Bond in seven films from 1973 to 1985.

I was surprised to learn that he was three years older than Sean Connery, the first James Bond. Connery paid tribute to Moore, stating that their relationship was “filled with jokes and laughter.” Pierce Brosnan, the fifth Bond, called him “a magnificent James Bond.” Daniel Craig, the current Bond, quoted the theme song from Moore’s 1977 film, The Spy Who Loved Me: “Nobody does it better.”

Moore’s passing reminded us of his iconic stature. It also highlighted his remarkable commitment to children as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador. He served the organization for twenty-six years and was awarded its UK Lifetime Achievement Award.

We are wise to look for ways to redeem the consequences of living in a fallen world. For instance, two homeless men who rendered aid to victims of the bombing in Manchester are being hailed today for their selflessness and courage.

As British authorities continue responding to the tragedy, we should remember that Ramadan begins at sundown tomorrow. Muslims the world over will pray more and fast from sunrise to sunset, hoping their good works will gain Allah’s favor. This is one of the best times of the year to pray for Jesus to reveal himself to Muslims and lead millions to salvation by grace through faith in him (Ephesians 2:8–9). For more on reaching the Muslim world, I encourage you to visit my friends at GFM Ministries.

One of the ways God redeems tragedy is by using it to shine a spotlight on those who respond to suffering in faith. Anne Graham Lotz: “A witness that is lived can be as powerful as one that is spoken. It’s not what you say but who you are that catches the attention of those around you—which is one reason God allows grievances, crises, sufferings, injustice, and hardship to come into our lives. Because problems offer us the opportunity to give silent, relevant witness to the difference faith in God can make. The problems enable us to become a showcase so that the world can look into our lives and see the glory of God revealed.”

In The Valley of Vision: A Collection of Puritan Prayers and Devotions, we find this prayer for the valleys of life:

Lord, high and holy, meek and lowly,
Thou hast brought me to the valley of vision,
where I live in the depths but see thee in the heights;
hemmed in by mountains of sin I behold thy glory.

Let me learn by paradox
that the way down is the way up,
that to be low is to be high,
that the broken heart is the healed heart,
that the contrite spirit is the rejoicing spirit,
that the repenting soul is the victorious soul,
that to have nothing is to possess all,
that to bear the cross is to wear the crown,
that to give is to receive,
that the valley is the place of vision.

The apostle John testified, “This is the victory that has overcome the world—our faith” (1 John 5:4). Will you overcome the world today?